Maker’s Field Guide

Make Good Great: Use Paper as a Bonus Color

Colored paper opens up new possibilities for design and communication. Used with 4-color printing, it can become part of the image itself, giving you an additional color to work with. Have you ever thought about using colored paper as a bonus in your project?

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Make Good Great: Contrasting Texture

Pairing dramatically different textures can heighten sophistication and elevate your message, capturing your audiences’ attention through touch. Have you ever thought about using textures so different from one another that they spark people’s senses as their fingers move from one texture to another?

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Elevate the Everyday: A Maker’s Field Guide to Envelopes

An envelope is a simple and familiar form. It requires no power source or special reader to be held, read and understood. Equal parts function and first impression, an envelope has all the right elements to make any project exceptional.

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Make Good Great: Matching Texture to Content

We’ve seen that the way paper feels is powerful and how we use it can make a difference. Every project is about something, be it adventure travel or single origin chocolate. Have you ever thought about finding textures in the content, product or stories that you can emulate through paper?

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Paper is Part of the Picture

Does pink signify modern and bold? Or does it seem soft and feminine? Perception of color—including context, culture and personal preferences—shapes our response to the colors we see. Perception of color is why red signifies “stop” when you see it on the street, and “love” when you see it in the greeting card aisle. It’s why color has different meanings across the globe. It’s why the client says she hates purple.

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The Haptic Power of Paper

hap•tic  or hap•tical adj. [<Gk. haptesthai, to touch.] Of or pertaining to the sense of touch.

When you are selling premium leather riding gear, haptic perception is what it’s all about.

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