Happy Thanksgiving from the Strathmore Archive

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Give your stomachs a break & feast on these wonderful 1920s illustrations from the Strathmore Archive.

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Most Recent

Greetabl: The (Superfine) card that’s also a box

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Today, guest blogger, Sarah Schwartz, editor of Stationery Trends and The Paper Chronicles, brings us the story of Greetabl.

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Issue #10 of the Mohawk Maker Quarterly is all about beauty

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Beauty isn’t a superficial aesthetic trait; it inspires, moves and engages us. It triggers emotion. It attracts. It gives pleasure. What’s more, beauty is universal: Everyone, regardless of culture, age or experience can recognize and appreciate a beautiful person, scene, object or sound, even though we have differing opinions of what qualifies as beautiful.

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Breathing Lights: Bringing Attention and Beauty to Cities’ Vacant Buildings

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Across the United States, vacant homes and properties are a continuous problem Americans face. Visually, they are unappealing and lack life however, these vacant properties also take a heavy toll on our economic growth and the communities they are located within. Breathing Lights is looking to shed light on this problem through an innovative art installation that brings this issue to the forefront…right in Mohawk’s back yard.

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A Very Superfine Anniversary: 70 Years of Timeless Appeal

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Think of Superfine as the little black dress of paper. It makes everything look good, from letterpress wedding invitations to digitally printed posters. In a world of so many choices, every designer needs a trusted, go-to paper they can count on, especially when they are in a pinch, and Superfine has been just that to many creatives for 70 years. Yes, you read that correctly—70 years.

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Paper is Part of the Picture

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Does pink signify modern and bold? Or does it seem soft and feminine? Perception of color—including context, culture and personal preferences—shapes our response to the colors we see. Perception of color is why red signifies “stop” when you see it on the street, and “love” when you see it in the greeting card aisle. It’s why color has different meanings across the globe. It’s why the client says she hates purple.

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