Mohawk Maker Quarterly

Out of Line: The Incredible Creative Impact of Sketching

Doodling, drawing, workshopping, outlining: call it what you may, but putting pen to paper in search of something new is a powerful creative catalyst. Ideation and imagination need room to work it out, and based on psychological research and artistic practice, sketching space is the place where it often happens.

Furthermore »

Welcome to Mohawk Maker Quarterly #11: The Process Issue

The process of making something — method, materials, ingredients, artistry, experience — is the squiggly line between idea and object. In issue 11 of the Mohawk Maker Quarterly, we celebrate makers who take conscious paths to get from Point A to Point B.

Furthermore »

The Story of Strathmore

2017 marks the 125th anniversary of Strathmore and we’ll be celebrating this milestone all year. Since its beginnings in 1892, the Strathmore name has been synonymous with beauty, quality and the finest papers for artists, designers and printers around the world.

Furthermore »

How Did Beauty Get Such a Bad Rap?

How did beauty get such a bad rap? Architect Louis Sullivan did it no favors when he declared, “form follows function.” Modern artists, architects and designers wrote beauty off as a surface trait employed for its own sake. And while we’ve been through countless artistic and cultural trends since then, beauty has retained its negative connotation. To call something ‘beautiful’ is to suggest it is pretty on the outside, but otherwise unsubstantial, hollow.

Furthermore »

Issue #10 of the Mohawk Maker Quarterly is all about beauty

Beauty isn’t a superficial aesthetic trait; it inspires, moves and engages us. It triggers emotion. It attracts. It gives pleasure. What’s more, beauty is universal: Everyone, regardless of culture, age or experience can recognize and appreciate a beautiful person, scene, object or sound, even though we have differing opinions of what qualifies as beautiful.

Furthermore »

Paper is Part of the Picture

Does pink signify modern and bold? Or does it seem soft and feminine? Perception of color—including context, culture and personal preferences—shapes our response to the colors we see. Perception of color is why red signifies “stop” when you see it on the street, and “love” when you see it in the greeting card aisle. It’s why color has different meanings across the globe. It’s why the client says she hates purple.

Furthermore »